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If a bomber crew was assigned a particular aircraft, they were sometimes able to choose the name and artwork and this enabled a powerful bond to develop between the men and the machine.

Nose Art – Indian Head

Halifax Mk. III (serial MZ655) was a No. 431 Squadron aircraft and carried the markings "RV-T" but it had no name. However an Indian with a head-dress was painted on…

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Nose Art – Jake Sent Me

With a large red maple leaf for nose art and smaller leaves for bomb tally backgrounds, this Halifax Mk III (serial LK828) was truly "Canadian." It was delivered to No.…

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Nose Art – Jumpin Jiminy

Halifax Mk. VII (serial PN236) was delivered to No. 432 Squadron on 28 February 45 however it did not carry out any operations. On 7 March 1945, PN236 was transferred…

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Nose Art – Notorious Nan

Halifax Mk. VII (serial NP747) was delivered to No. 408 Squadron on 10 August 1944 and became the "property" of a ground crew made up of Gale, Howley, Shearer, Jaxon,…

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Nose Art – Ol’ Daid Eye

The painting of "tail art" was very rare but two Halifax aircraft carried impressive paintings. One was Halifax Mk. VII (serial LW207) which was delivered to No. 420 Squadron on…

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Nose Art – Introduction
Replica painting by Clarence Simonsen.

Nose Art – Introduction

Nose Art During World War II, the personalization of an aircraft by giving it a name, painting an image on it, and in many cases doing both began in the…

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